Posture. What do we really know?

Posture is a frequent topic of discussion for physiotherapists, clients, the media and society. A common belief is that spinal pain is caused by sitting, standing, or bending “incorrectly”. Many patients tell us, “I know I have bad posture” before we begin examining them. It is often assumed that “incorrect” posture is the cause of pain and needs changing, but does it? What does the science tell us?  Is there such a thin.

Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD)

What is the Lymphatic System? The lymphatic system consists of a network of organs and tissues that help the body dispose of toxins and other waste products. It also transports lymph (fluid) which carries infection fighting white blood cells to where they are needed. It plays a key role within the immune system and its purpose is to manage fluid levels in the body as well as dealing with bacteria, cancer cells and waste by-products of bodily functions that could lead to disease and disorder if not addr.

Muscle imbalances

What is a muscle imbalance? To properly understand what is meant by muscle imbalance, it is essential to understand the fine balance in which our bodies operate. Different types of tissue have different roles. Some tissues have the ability to change their length and guide movement. Muscles, for example, will contract and relax to change their length to alter the position of other tissues, usually bone. Because of this function, they.

Archies thongs now at Malvern Physio

The foot typically has 28 bones, 33 joints and more than one hundred muscles, tendons and ligaments, making it a very complex moving structure. It also has two main arches through it, along the length and width of the foot. All these structures allow for many functions, but two are particularly important: shock absorption on impact, and creating a rigid structure for the calf to pull on to generate propulsion.  Pronation, or the collapsing of the arch of the foot is part of this shock absorbing process..

Blood flow restriction strength training

Blood Flow Restriction (BFR) strength training is a new option in rehabilitation for those needing to increase muscle size and strength, and who also need to reduce the stress on their joints. Even though BFR is new in terms of Western clinical application, there is over 40 years’ worth of research that has gone into the development of BFR training protocols. It originated in Japan in the 1960’s by Dr. Yoshiaki Sato and is known as “Kaatsu Training”, which translates to “Training Under Pressure”. Sin.

Georgia Snow

Georgia graduated from the University of Notre Dame, Perth with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy in 2015. She has worked in private practice in Western Australia, before making the move to Melbourne in January 2019. Georgia also has training in Clinical Pilates and believes it is a great tool in rehabilitation. Georgia enjoys treating a wide variety of musculoskeletal injuries, and has a keen interest in sports related injuries, particularly AFL as she has worked with AFL, VFLW, WAFL an.